compilation "Banyan Tree"

A Clearer View: New Insight into the sudbury school model by Daniel Greenberg from Banyan Tree.

This book shows how the people who struggled to implement this new educational model deepened their understanding of topics such as play, conversation, and democracy. The talks were collected in this wonderful book which packs a big punch in a little volume. It is particularly valuable for parents considering Sudbury model education for their children.

"We always felt that Sudbury Valley was the best place to develop each childs unique potential to the fullest. That was a given for us from day one. The question is, how does this beautiful concept relate to setting up a school? It turns out that, when you think of the notion of developing each childs unique destiny, you realize that it connects directly into the great debate of Nature vs. Nurture. And the fact is that, at least in this juncture in human history, no one has an answer to the question of which of these is the determining factor, or the most important factor, or what relative weight can be given to each one. Both factors seem to play a role. So, for us, the question became, how does the school environment relate to each of these two factors,assuming that they both play a role? How does the school environment help each child to realize their own destiny."

"That idea is the origin of the schools "Art of Doing Nothing" concept. In other words, outsiders-staff, or parents, or other members of the school community-have to take great care not to intervene in this natural unfolding of the childs capabilities. Thats very important to us in the school. It has been for a long time. Its become reinforced by our experience over and over again. We have come to understand clearly that any intervention engaged in by the school will undermine, to a certain extent, the innate natural drives and tendencies of a growing child."


In our For Children section, Rs. 200, in paperback, 142 pages, ISBN: 9789382400042


Starting a Sudbury School: A summary of the experiences of the fifteen start-up groups by Daniel Greenberg And Mimsy Sadofsky from Banyan Tree.

"Maybe potential founders could get a taste of what it is like before they actually commit themselves to it, by going into a commercial laundromat, getting inside one of those industrial dryers, putting it on an hour-long cycle and and having it get stuck and go for a week instead."

Starting a Sudbury School offers a glimpse into the mechanics of beginning a new school. It analyzes various steps that founding groups have taken to get their schools off the ground and allow them to thrive in the early years. Included are dozens of stories describing triumphs and pitfalls encountered along the way.

The Sudbury Valley School is a place, where children can "just be". There is no curriculum, no classes, no grades, no coercion, no uniforms, no bells and none of the rituals which define a regular school.

Here children are treated as responsible citizens and they carry the burden oftheir own education. Unless asked, the teachers "stay away" from the children. Here children discover their own innate interests and then gallantly pursue them. And because they chose them, they also rough it out and learn them well. So, children become the true architects of their own education. The Sudbury valley school experience has inspired others to start similar schools elsewhere.


In our For Children section, Rs. 300, in paperback, 222 pages, ISBN: 9789382400059


Education In America: A View from Sudbury Valley by Daniel Greenberg from Banyan Tree.

How does the prevailing system of schooling measure up to modern day requirements? A collection of essays addresses this question from various angles. As India is fast adopting the American model of schooling, this book is equally important for India.

"The only way the schools can become meaningful purveyors of ethical values is if they provide students and adults with real-life experiences that are bearers of moral import. Such experiences are notoriously absent from the current daily routines of schools. They include, for example, students making choices that are significant for their lives, within the school setting; choices such as how to educate themselves to be productive adults.

They include students exercising judgment in consequential matters, such as school rules and discipline. I could go on at length giving examples, but the point is simple, and needs little elaboration: to teach morality to students, they must have opportunities to choose between alternative courses of action that have different ethical weight, and they must be allowed to evaluate and discuss the outcomes of these choices."


In our Education section, Rs. 300, in paperback, 246 pages, ISBN: 9789382400035


The Sudbury Valley School Experience: A summary of the experiences of the fifteen start-up groups by Daniel Greenberg And Mimsy Sadofsky from Banyan Tree.

How do Sudbury Schools work? For over thirty years, founders, staffs, students and parents have written about this exhilarating new way of schooling children. Many excellent articles on the concepts and experiences that make up a Sudbury School have been collected in this book, which provides a solid introduction to this model of education. One of the profound truthsone learn is that we are all so different from each other that peer pressure and comparisons of worth are meaningless.

"The people who play sports as we do at S.V.S. learn far more profound lessons about life than those that can be taught by regimented, performanceoriented sports. They learn teamwork-not the we against them type of teamwork, but the teamwork of a diverse group of people of diverse talents organizing themselves to pursue a common activity-the teamwork of life. Theylearn excellence, not the Im a star type of excellence, but the type of excellence that comes from setting a standard for yourself to live up to and then trying your best to live up to it."


In our For Children section, Rs. 300, in paperback, 215 pages, ISBN: 9789382400066


Child Rearing by Daniel Greenberg from Banyan Tree.

In this book, the author presents his view of parenting and child development, in a context harmonious with the principles of the Sudbury model.
"One thread that runs through every point in this book-letting things go their own way, letting children develop their own curiosity freely, letting people make all the mistakes they can on the way to developing their judgment- is that all these things involve an enormous amount of time, and require patience. You have got to have time to work things out. Perhaps the most devastating feature of our society is its preoccupation with speed.

In fact, the single most effective tool society has for squelching creativity and independenc is rushing everybody to death. How often have I seen people who have almost reached their goals suddenly stop and say, Time is flying by, I have got to move on, and then all of their relaxed ability to work things out goes down the drain. Some people find their life calling at six, others at thirty-six, others much later. Things have just got to be allowed to work themselves out in their own good time." The Sudbury Valley School is a place, where children can "just be". There is no curriculum, no classes, no grades, no coercion, no uniforms, no bells and none of the rituals which define a regular school.

Here children are treated as responsible citizens and they carry the burden of their own education. Unless asked, the teachers "stay away" from the children. Here children discover their own innate interests and then gallantly pursue them. And because they chose them, they also rough it out and learnthem well. So, children become the true architects of their own education.The Sudbury valley school experience has inspired others to start similarschools elsewhere. Today, 30 such schools on Sudbury concept are spreadover eight different countries.


In our For Children section, Rs. 250, in paperback, 176 pages, ISBN: 9789382400073

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